Helensburgh Heritage Trust Photo Gallery

Your online photo album


Home :: Login
Helensburgh Heritage Trust :: Album list :: Last uploads :: Last comments :: Most viewed :: Top rated :: My Favorites :: Search
Choose your language:

Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Religion

Row-Kirk-1763-81.jpg
Second Rhu Church743 viewsA very old image of the second Row Kirk which stood from 1763-1851 when the present church and tower was built. The first Row Kirk was completed in 1649, a year after the Parish of Row was created from lands belonging to the ancient parishes of Cardross and Rosneath.
Row_Parish_Church.jpg
Row Parish Church695 viewsA 1904 image of Rhu — then Row — Parish Church. It dates from 1851 and stands on the site of an 18th century predecessor. Amongst those buried in the kirkyard is Henry Bell, whose Comet was the world's first commercially successful steamship. In 1851 the marine engineer Robert Napier built the statue which today marks Bell's grave.
Shandon-w.jpg
Shandon Church487 viewsBuilt in 1844 as Shandon Free Church, it became linked with Rhu Church in 1954. It continued in use until 1981 and was then converted into housing, with the height of the steeple being substantially reduced. Shandon Pier used to stand straight across the road from the church. Photo by Professor John Hume.
Shandon_Church009.jpg
Shandon Church655 viewsShandon Church with the start of the pier opposite, circa 1908. It became linked with Rhu Church in 1954, which led to full union in 1971. It ceased to be a church in 1981, and was converted into dwellings.
St-Bride_s-Church-group-photo-w.jpg
St Bride's Church Kirk Session849 viewsThis image, supplied by Mary Greenwell, is thought to be of the Kirk Session of St Bride's Church at a Session Dinner in the Queen's Hotel, set up by J.Arnold Fleming as a social evening for Session members, circa 1962. Back row: Peter Slater, Jackie McKenzie, Tom Aitken, Charles Swain, David Watson, William Williamson; middle: Walter Johnson, John Allan, Malcolm Osborne, Ian Maclachlan, George Gardiner, George Christie, Hugh Hogarth, Douglas Robertson, Stanley Mill, Alasdair MacDougall; front: Jimmy White, Max Wilkinson, Norman Watt, George Speirs, the Rev Robert S.Cairns, George Primrose, Mr McColl, Ian Balfour, W.B.Gardner Henderson.
St-Bride_s-Church-sketch.jpg
Sketch of St Bride's Church692 viewsA sketch of St Bride's Church, which stood in West King Street at the junction with John Street. It is from the book 'Sketches of Churches and Clergy, published by Macneur and Bryden Ltd. of Helensburgh in 1889. Originally known as the West Parish Church, St Bride's Church was opened on March 10 1878. Its first minister was the Rev John Baird, father of TV inventor John Logie Baird. In 1981 it was united with the then Old and St Andrew's Church in Colquhoun Square to become the West Kirk, and a few years later it was demolished and replaced by a new burgh library and flats.
St-Bride_s-Church4064.jpg
St Bride's Church807 viewsOriginally known as the West Parish Church, St Bride's Church at the corner of John Street and West King Street was opened on March 10 1878. Its first minister was the Rev John Baird, father of TV inventor John Logie Baird. In 1981 it was united with the then Old and St Andrew's Church in Colquhoun Square to become the West Kirk, and a few years later it was demolished and replaced by a new burgh library and flats.
St-Bride_s-w.jpg
St Bride's Church519 viewsThe development of this church started in 1867, but the building shown dates from 1878 and it stood at the corner of John Street and West King Street. For 42 years its minister was the Rev John Baird, father of television inventor John Logie Baird. In 1929 its name was changed from West Parish Church to St Bride's Church. It closed for worship in 1981 and was demolished nine years later. Flats now occupy the corner of the site and Helensburgh Library occupies the rest; three stained-glass windows from the church are on display in the Library. Photo by Professor John Hume.
St-Columba-w.jpg
St Columba Church488 viewsThis congregation started in 1839, but did not get its own building until 1844. In 1861 a bigger building was opened next door at the corner of Sinclair Street and West King Street, and the original building became the church hall. Originally called the United Secession Church, the name was changed to St Columba in 1900. The church closed for worship in 2011, and the building in the photo is now called The Tower and functions as a digital arts centre, including a cinema. The former church hall is to become the Scottish Submarine Centre. Photo by Professor John Hume.
St-Gildas-Church-w.jpg
St Gildas Church110 viewsThe Rosneath Catholic church, sited on part of the old Clachan House Estate, was designed as a representation of a ship under sail by Glasgow Architects Thomas Gardiner, Cunningham and Partners. The church was finished in March 1968 and named St Gildas in deference to the Church of Scotland whose church in Rosneath is St Modan's.
St-Joseph_s-Communion-1957-w.jpg
First Communicants721 viewsFirst Communicants at Helensburgh's St Joseph's Church. Image, circa 1957, supplied by John Booth whose youngest brother Harry is in the back row of the picture 4th boy from the end on the right.
St-Joseph_s-w.jpg
St Joseph's Church492 viewsThere was no Roman Catholic Church in Helensburgh until 1880 when a chapel with school was built in Grant Street where the present church halls are. The present church itself at the corner of Lomond Street and East King Street was opened in 1912. Photo by Professor John Hume.
88 files on 8 page(s) 5