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Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Religion

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Garelochhead UF Church31 viewsA 1918 image of Garelochead showing the United Free Church, which existed from 1873-1938, and cattle in the burn.
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Garelochhead Church574 viewsThere was no church in Garelochhead before the present building was constructed in 1837, making it one of the oldest in the area. A hall was added in 1894. Photo by Professor John Hume.
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General Booth in Burgh694 viewsGeneral William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, visited Helensburgh on October 26 1910 to give a lecture in the Victoria Hall, staying overnight with the Kidston family at Ferniegair. He is pictured at Helensburgh pier the next day before leaving for Port Glasgow, with Provost David S.Maclachlan saying farewell. The gentleman in the bowler hat is the Lord Lieutenant of Dunbartonshire, Lord Inverclyde. Image supplied by Provost Billy Petrie.
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General Booth805 viewsThe founder of the Salvation Army, General William Booth, leaves from Helensburgh pier the day after speaking at the Victoria Hall on October 26 1910, and is seen with Provost David S.Maclachlan. Booth, born in 1826, was the son of a Nottingham builder and converted to Christianity aged 15. He became a revivalist preacher, and in 1865 he and his wife Catherine set up a Christian Mission in London's east end to help the poor. It was reorganised along military lines in 1878, and the Salvation Army was born. He died in 1912.
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General Booth24 viewsThe founder of the Salvation Army, General William Booth, arrived at Helensburgh Central Station before speaking at the Victoria Hall on October 26 1910, and was welcomed by Provost David S.Maclachlan. Booth, born in 1826, was the son of a Nottingham builder and converted to Christianity aged 15. He became a revivalist preacher, and in 1865 he and his wife Catherine set up a Christian Mission in London's east end to help the poor. It was reorganised along military lines in 1878, and the Salvation Army was born. He died in 1912. Image supplied by Malcolm LeMay.
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General Booth19 viewsThe founder of the Salvation Army, General William Booth, leaves from Helensburgh pier the day after speaking at the Victoria Hall on October 26 1910, and is seen with Provost David S.Maclachlan. Booth, born in 1826, was the son of a Nottingham builder and converted to Christianity aged 15. He became a revivalist preacher, and in 1865 he and his wife Catherine set up a Christian Mission in London's east end to help the poor. It was reorganised along military lines in 1878, and the Salvation Army was born. He died in 1912.Image supplied by Malcolm LeMay.
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St Andrew's Church Junior Choir702 viewsThe Junior Choir of the then St Andrew's Church (now Helensburgh Parish Church) is pictured about 1961. The choir was conducted by Mrs McIntyre (wife of Jim McIntyre of Dow's meat counter) and then by Mrs Rita Peoples. Image supplied by Alistair Quinlan.
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Luss Church447 viewsIt is believed that St Kessog (or MacKessog) founded a church in Luss in the year 510, and it was in the name of Kessog that King Robert the Bruce went into battle against the English at Bannockburn in 1314. However the present building was opened in 1875 to commemorate the deaths of Sir James Colquhoun and a group of his gamekeepers in a boating accident in Loch Lomond two years earlier — indeed from inside the roof looks like an upturned boat. Some of the graves in the churchyard go back to the 7th or 8th century, and there is also a Viking hogback stone. Photo by Professor John Hume.
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Luss Parish Church648 viewsLuss Parish Church, circa 1907. This picturesque village church, the third on this site on the banks of Loch Lomond, was built by Sir James Colquhoun in 1875 in the memory of his father who died along with five ghillies in a drowning accident off Inchtavannach. It has beautiful stained glass windows and a uniquely timbered roof, featured frequently in the TV soap 'Take the High Road', and has also hosted many celebrity weddings. The ancient graveyard has 15 listed ancient monuments, the earliest lie at the main entrance to the church, two slabs, each with a simple cross from the 7th or 8th century.
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Luss Parish Church Window795 viewsA Colquhoun memorial window.
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Ministers Fraternal833 viewsMembers of Helensburgh and District Ministers Fraternal pictured at a Christian Unity evening service in St Columba Church, Helensburgh, in January 1972. The morning service that day had been a rededication of the church, back in use after being closed for six months for dry rot repairs. From left: the Rev Dr T.Crowther Gordon, the Rev Robert Cairns, the Rev Merricks Arnott, the Rev A.Douglas Stirling, the Rev Alan Johnston, the Rev Lindsay Parkinson, the Rev Tom Gordon, St Columba minister the Rev Andrew Mitchell, the Rev Dr George R.Logan, unknown.
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Old Parish Church interior780 viewsThe interior of Helensburgh's Old Parish Church, which stood on the seafront and later became a Church of Scotland centre for servicemen and women. Now only the tower is standing, and contains the tourist information office. Image supplied by the Rev David Clark.
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