Helensburgh Heritage Trust Photo Gallery

Your online photo album


Home :: Login
Helensburgh Heritage Trust :: Album list :: Last uploads :: Last comments :: Most viewed :: Top rated :: My Favorites :: Search
Choose your language:

Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Transport — Steamers

Most viewed - Transport — Steamers
Loch_Lomond_steamer.jpg
Loch Lomond 1900956 viewsA paddle steamer pictured on Loch Lomond on July 23 1900.
Craigendoran_Pier008.jpg
Craigendoran Pier955 viewsA view from the sea of a steamer berthed at Craigendoran Pier, with the station in the background. Image date unknown.
PS_Balmoral_198719.jpg
All Aboard953 viewsPassengers prepare to board the steamer Balmoral at Helensburgh Pier in 1987.
PS_Saint_Columba2284.jpg
TS Saint Columba938 viewsThe 785-ton turbine steamer was launched on April 9 1912 at the yard of William Denny & Bros Ltd., Dumbarton. Placed on the Campeltown run in succession to her namesake, she was requisitioned as a troop transport ship from 1915 to 1919 during which time she rammed and sank a German U-Boat. After the war she served Campbeltown, Inveraray and Ardrishaig until World War Two, when she was an accommodation ship at Greenock. She returned to the summer Ardrishaig service from 1947 until the end of the 1958 season, but was withdrawn and scrapped shortly afterwards. She is pictured arriving at Rothesay, circa 1950.
Waverley_Old_LNER~0.jpg
The first Waverley935 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image date unknown.
Lucy-Ashton-at-Hel-pier4793.jpg
Lucy Ashton at Helensburgh933 viewsThe 200 ton steamer Lucy Ashton, built in 1888, leaves Helensburgh pier for Craigendoran. Image date unknown, but before the outdoor swimming pool was built in 1928.
TSS_Duchess_of_Montrose2275.jpg
TSS Duchess of Montrose930 viewsThe 806-ton turbine steamer was launched on May 10 1930 at the yard of William Denny & Bros Ltd., Dumbarton. The first 'one-class' vessel on the Clyde, she cruised in the lower Firth to Arran, Ayr and as far as Stranraer, Campbeltown and Inveraray, and she remained on the Clyde during World War II serving Wemyss Bay and Rothesay. Converted to oil in 1956 she undertook the long cruises, especially to Inveraray, in the post-war period. She was withdrawn in 1964, and scrapped in Ghent, Belgium, in 1965.
PS_Caledonia_at_Ayr2652.jpg
PS Caledonia924 viewsThe paddle steamer Caledonia, seen leaving Ayr in the 1960s, was launched on February 1 1934 by Wm. Denny & Bros. Ltd. at Dumbarton. The 624-ton vessel served as a minesweeper named HMS Goatfell during the Second World War. After being based at Ayr, she replaced the Jeanie Deans at Craigendoran. After 1969, renamed Old Caledonia, she served as a Bass Charrington floating pub moored on the Embankment in central London, until badly damaged by fire in 1980, then was scrapped.
Rhu_steamer2532.jpg
Steamer at Rhu921 viewsA steamer, probably the 271-ton Lucy Ashton which was used on the Craigendoran-Gareloch run, leaves Rhu (then Row) Pier, with the training ship Empress beyond. Circa 1905.
Lucy_Ashton-21909.jpg
PS Lucy Ashton919 viewsThe Lucy Ashton approaches Barremman Pier at Clynder. She operated the Craigendoran - Gareloch - Greenock service from the early 1900s until she was withdrawn during the Second World War. The pier was built about 1887 on the instructions of Robert Thom, owner of Barremman Estate, and demolished in 1967.
PS-Jeanie-Deans5311.jpg
PS Jeanie Deans917 viewsThe popular paddle steamer Jeanie Deans, circa 1933. She was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.
Talisman1875.jpg
DEPV Talisman908 viewsBuilt in 1935 by A. & J.Inglis, Pointhouse, Glasgow, for the London & North Eastern Railway, this 544-ton diesel-electric direct drive paddle steamer was used on year-round runs from Craigendoran to Rothesay and the Kyles of Bute. She saw World War Two service as HMS Aristocrat, including acting as a HQ ship at the Normandy landings. After 1953 she was allocated to the Wemyss Bay - Largs - Millport ferry route. She was withdrawn after the 1966 season and broken up for scrap at Dalmuir in 1967.
89 files on 8 page(s) 3