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Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Transport — Steamers

Last additions - Transport — Steamers
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Rhu Pier staff759 viewsStaff and passengers wait at Rhu Pier. Image date unknown.Sep 26, 2012
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Waverley at Craigendoran779 viewsThe steamer Waverley at Craigendoran pier in 1968, with part of the Caledonia in view. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the first Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, and cruised the Clyde until 1973 for Caledonian-MacBrayne. In 1974 she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975. She calls regularly at Helensburgh in summer.Sep 26, 2012
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The first Waverley945 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image date unknown.Jun 27, 2012
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Craigendoran Pier963 viewsA view from the sea of a steamer berthed at Craigendoran Pier, with the station in the background. Image date unknown.Jun 27, 2012
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Comet Replica731 viewsThe Comet replica built in 1962 and steamed across the Clyde to mark the 150th anniversary of Henry Bell's Comet, seen in its permanent home in Port Glasgow.May 02, 2012
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Waverley and Balmoral997 viewsThe Paddle Steamer Waverley, built in 1947 on the Clyde, and Classic Cruise Ship Balmoral, built in 1949 in Southampton, were together in dry dock for the first time ever on April 18 2012. The Garvel Clyde Dry Dock in Greenock was playing host to these ships, which this year are celebrating 200 years of commercial steam navigation, with the anniversary of Henry Bell’s Comet which was built in Port Glasgow.Apr 21, 2012
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PS Jeanie Deans884 viewsA packed Jeanie Deans pictured shortly after leaving Craigendoran Pier in 1954. The paddle steamer was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.Jan 24, 2012
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Leaving Tarbet pier761 viewsA steamer — identity unknown — leaves Tarbet pier, looking north on Loch Lomond. Image circa 1920.Dec 29, 2011
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PS Industry725 viewsThis painting shows the early Clyde Shipping Company paddle steamer Industry in 1815. It appeared on a postcard published in 1990 to mark 175 years of the company and Glasgow being European City of Culture. Launched in 1814, she became the seventh steamboat to service the Clyde, mainly carrying luggage and cargo between Greenock and Glasgow, but also serving as one of the Clyde’s first tugs. Her career spanned over half a century and prior to her retirement she was the oldest steamer operating on the Clyde.Sep 05, 2011
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The first Waverley717 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image circa 1925.Sep 05, 2011
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Lucy Ashton at war794 viewsThe 271-ton Lucy Ashton was launched on May 24 1888 by T.B.Seath at Rutherglen. She began on the Holy Loch run but later became more familiar on the Gareloch service from Craigendoran. She remained on the Clyde throughout both world wars, and is pictured on the Clyde during the Second World War. She made her last run in February 1949. Her stripped down hull saw further experimental use by the British Shipbuilding Research Association, including being fitted with a jet engine.May 29, 2011
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DEPV Talisman888 viewsBuilt in 1935 by A. & J.Inglis, Pointhouse, Glasgow, for the London & North Eastern Railway, the 544-ton diesel-electric direct drive paddle steamer was used on year-round runs from Craigendoran to Rothesay and the Kyles of Bute. She saw World War Two service as HMS Aristocrat, including being an HQ ship at the Normandy landings. After 1953 she was allocated to the Wemyss Bay - Largs - Millport ferry route. She was withdrawn after the 1966 season and broken up for scrap at Dalmuir in 1967. Image taken 1946.May 19, 2011
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