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Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law

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Bonar Law's birthplace121 viewsThe Andrew Bonar Law story began in this house in Rexton, a small village in eastern New Brunswick, Canada, where he was born on 16th September 1858, the youngest of five children, and he also had two younger half-sisters. His father, the Rev James Law, MA, was a Scottish Free Church minister, his mother Elizabeth a member of the Kidston family of rich merchant bankers which has played such an important part in Helensburgh’s history.
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Bonar Law the singer116 viewsA postcard size programme for a Members Concert in the House of Commons, with Andrew Bonar Law singing "Anchored". Other performers included Lloyd George, Asquith, Winston Churchill and Keir Hardie.
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Bonar Law demonstration postcard715 viewsA sketch of what was claimed to be the largest Union Jack in the Empire being unfurled at the Bonar Law demonstration in Belfast on Easter Tuesday 1912, calling for 'No Home Rule'. Published by 'Town Topics', 30 Chichester Street, Belfast.
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Glasgow speech707 viewsAndrew Bonar Law speaks to 1,000 of his party faithful at a meeting in the St Andrew's Hall, Glasgow, in October 1922. He set forth the principles on which his party stood, and devoted the opening of his speech to an explanation of how he came to resume the leadership of his party. This came about, he said, when he realised that the Coalition was losing ground and a split was inevitable.
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The Bonar Law family grave671 viewsThe Bonar Law family grave in Helensburgh Cemetery. However, as he was a Prime Minister, the ashes of Andrew Bonar Law are buried at Westminster Cathedral. Photo by Stewart Noble.
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Bonar Law lantern slide407 viewsA Magic Lantern Slide of Andrew Bonar Law crossing a road in London. Image date unknown.
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On route to Paris670 viewsPrime Minister Andrew Bonar Law pictured in The Graphic newspaper on his way to Paris for what turned out to be an unsuccessful conference on World War One reparations in January 1923. He proposed a scheme, which went by his name, for a final settlement of the reparations problem as an alternative to the application of force. However Poincare's French Government refused this scheme out of hand, and proceeded at once to the occupation of the Ruhr.
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Peace delegate178 viewsA French image of Andrew Bonar Law, then Lord Privy Seal, as one of the five British delegates to the Paris Peace Conference held between January 12 1919 and January 21 1920 to devise the treaties that ended the First World War.
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Working the crowd663 viewsAndrew Bonar Law makes a speech at an unknown location surrounded by dignitaries, circa 1920.
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Portrait711 viewsA studio portrait published in The Graphic newspaper in the spring of 1921 when, citing ill health, Andrew Bonar Law retired from the leadership of the Conservative branch of the Lloyd George government in the spring of 1921. His counterpart in the House of Lords, Austen Chamberlain succeeded him as Leader of the House of Commons and also took over the office of Lord Privy Seal.
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Victorious92 viewsHelensburgh's Prime Minister, Andrew Bonar Law, is seen saluting the Conservatives general election victory in this illustration from the Punch edition of November 22 1922.
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Ulster demo668 viewsAndrew Bonar Law, recently elected leader of the Conservative Party and the Leader of the Opposition, was guest of honour at a meticulously planned Ulster unionist demonstration at the Royal Ulster Agricultural Showground at Balmoral on Easter Tuesday 1912. Whereas Winston Churchill’s speech in Celtic Park on 8 February 1912 had an audience of 5,000 nationalists and liberals, Law was astounded to find himself with an audience of between 100,000 and 200,000, one of the largest political demonstrations in British history. He spoke eloquently, invoking the siege of Derry as a paradigm for Ulster’s plight, identifying the Parliament Act of 1911 as the equivalent of the boom constructed by the Jacobites across the Foyle during the great siege.
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